Creating a Foldable on Any Topic

How do I create a foldable on any topic?


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SECTIONS:

First, I decide how many sections I will need based on the topic I plan to use.

For example, if I want to create a foldable on fraction operations, I will need four sections: adding fractions, subtracting fractions, multiplying fractions, and dividing fractions.  If I split each section approximately in half, I can separate the rules from the examples.

Once I know the number of sections needed,  I must decide which style of foldable I want to use.


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STYLE:

A few ideas come to mind right away:

Flaps/Windows

Benefits of Flaps/Windows:  

  • They help students focus on one topic at a time by giving them the ability to open just one section at a time.
  • The flaps are great for quizzing/memorization.

Disadvantages of Flaps/Windows:

  • Inevitably some students will accidentally rip off a flap.  Don’t worry, you can always tape it back on.
  • Some cutting is required to create the flaps/windows.

    Check Out Some Examples:

        4 flaps all facing the same direction

FractionsFoldable4FlapsAmyHarrisonOutsideFractionsFoldable4FlapsAmyHarrisonInside

If you chose to use this template, I suggest putting it in your math notebook so that the folds on the left hand side face the center binding.  The foldable goes on the right hand side page in your composition book to accomplish this.

Now, when the students open and close their books, they don’t have to worry about making sure that all of the flaps on the foldable are closed.  That is a great benefit of this foldable over the next option.  However, the flaps on this foldable are longer and can accidentally get torn off.

4 flaps with 2 on each side

FractionsFoldable4FlapsAmyHarrison2OnEachSideOutside

FractionsFoldable4FlapsAmyHarrison2OnEachSideInsideAmyHarrison

If you chose to use this template, it doesn’t matter if you put the foldable on the left hand side or the right hand side of your notebook.

If you put it on the right hand side of your notebook, the flaps on the right hand side of the foldable might misbehave when your students open/close their notebook.  Make sure that students close the flaps on the foldable before closing their notebook.  This will prevent the windows from getting smashed or torn off.

I enjoy the flap/window style because it allows for two sections for each topic:  one on the back of the cover, and the other inside the foldable.  When using this style, I like to keep it consistent:  all of the steps are on the back of the cover, and all of the examples are inside the foldable.

If you are having trouble deciding which flap/window template to use take a look at the shape of the sections and decide which one would be better for what you plan to write in it.

Both foldables have flaps/windows, and they take up the same amount of space.  However, I think the second option is better for writing the fraction operations steps, so I am leaning towards that one right now.


Accordion

Benefits of Accordion:  

  • If you are starting with copy paper, there is ABSOLUTELY NO CUTTING necessary. However, if you start with a template from the computer, you may want to cut off the excess margin.
  • The foldable takes up less space than the flap/window style, so there is more room to write on the notebook page next to the foldable.
  • It is less likely that a student will rip off part of the foldable because it is all one piece of paper with no cuts.

Disadvantages of Accordion:

  • It is harder to only show one section at a time.
    • In this example, adding and subtracting are shown at the same time, and multiplying and dividing are shown at the same time.
    • If students need to “block out” the other sections, consider having them use a piece of cardstock (so they can’t see through the paper) that is cut in thirds to cover the other section.
    • Another option:  have them put a folder over the section they need to cover.

SEE AN EXAMPLE HERE:

I chose this option because it is similar to some other foldables that I made recently, so I was determined to make something with this template.

Another reason I picked this one?  The other flap/window options are the FIRST that came to mind, so I thought that this one might be more unique.

Need more reasons?  I decided that it might be helpful to have both addition/subtraction showing at the same time since they have nearly all of the same steps.  Then, I realized that multiplication/division can benefit from being next to each other as well.  After all, division becomes multiplication after flipping the second fraction!


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CREATE YOUR TEACHER FOLDABLE

  • Fill out your cover/titles depending on which style you chose.
  • Decide the steps/rules you want to use.  Write them out on your foldable.  Make sure there is enough space for students to write everything comfortably.
  • Determine how many examples you have room for.  Write them out.
  • Solve all of your examples.  Make sure that you have enough room to fit all of the necessary work.  If you need more room, consider taking out one or more examples.

Here is what my accordion style fraction operations foldable looked like after I typed up my steps and wrote in some examples.

After I took these photos, I decided to add some lines to separate each of the problems.

I started with my student version that had numbers for the steps and all of the questions typed.   Then, I wrote out the steps and solved all of the problems.  I put a box around my answers.

Later I typed up all of the steps and answers to get a completed “Answer Key” foldable.

MultiplyingDividingFractionsSideComplete_AmyHarrisonAddingSubtractingFractionsSideCompleteAmyHarrison

 

 

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CONSIDER MAKING MULTIPLE VERSIONS

Now that you have completed your teacher foldable, YOU ARE FINISHED!  Make sure that you have your complete version (a.k.a. answer key) for your reference and partially completed versions for each class.  All of these can be made by hand, but you may want to consider making versions on the computer for easy printing and copying.

Check out my typed student versions and answer key:

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If you are going to go to the computer, make one version that is the same as what the students will fill out.  Then, you can print it and make two-sided copies.

You just saved your class some time since they won’t have to write every single problem. PLUS, there is something to be said about having a typed worksheet-like paper with all of the questions already on it.  It is impossible for students to write down the problems incorrectly and they are easily distinguished from the work and answers that the students will write in.

Typed Student Version 1:

MultiplyingDividingFractionsSideStudentVersion1_AmyHarrisonAddingSubtractingSideStudentVersion1_AmyHarrison

 

INCLUDED IN FIRST PRINTABLE STUDENT VERSION:

  • All Titles (Adding Fractions, Subtracting Fractions, Multiplying Fractions and Dividing Fractions)
  • Text on the Cover (FRACTION OPERATIONS) and Operation Symbols
  • All Questions

Students will start with the printed foldable above, write out the steps, work out the problems, and write the answers to get the completed version to glue in their math notebook.

Completed Student Version:

MultiplyingDividingSideStudentVersion1COMPLETE_AmyHarrisonAddingSubtractingSideStudentVersion1_COMPLETE_AmyHarrison

Creating even more versions can be helpful if you want to show only one part at a time. However, this can be accomplished by covering most of the foldable with paper.

I created a second student version that has all of the steps already typed out.  This will be great for accommodations or if I am looking to save some time.

Typed Student Version 2:

MultiplyingDividingFractionsSideStudentVersion2_AmyHarrisonAddingSubtractingSideStudentVersion2_AmyHarrison

INCLUDED IN SECOND PRINTABLE STUDENT VERSION:

  • All Titles (Adding Fractions, Subtracting Fractions, Multiplying Fractions and Dividing Fractions)
  • Text on the Cover (FRACTION OPERATIONS) and Operation Symbols
  • All Questions
  • Steps Typed

NOT INCLUDED IN EITHER PRINTABLE VERSION

  • Steps
  • Worked out problems

REMEMBER:

By taking the time to type up the questions, you will save your students and yourself some time.  Simply make copies instead of having to create everything by hand.  Now you can use the same foldable template next year, unless you are teaching a new grade 😦

WOULD YOU PREFER TO PURCHASE THE COMPLETED FRACTIONS FOLDABLE AND TEMPLATE INSTEAD OF MAKING YOUR OWN?  GET IT HERE!

FractionOperationsAccordionStyleFoldable_COVER.png

CHECK OUT ANOTHER FOLDABLE I MADE WITH THIS TEMPLATE FOR CONVERTING BETWEEN FRACTIONS, DECICMALS, AND PERCENTAGES:

FractionsDecimalsPercentsFoldable_PIN [Autosaved] [Autosaved]

 

 

AmyHarrisonBWSquare

Square Roots Reference Card

It can be very overwhelming to work with square roots of non-perfect squares.  Use this FREE square roots reference card to help your students as they begin working with square roots.  Later, have students memorize their perfect squares from the square root of 1 to at least the square root of 225.

Get the FREE .pdf here: SquareRootsReferenceCardFrom1to400

4×5 Square Roots Reference Card:

SquareRootsReferenceCard_1-400_4x5_WhiteBackground

5×4 Square Roots Reference Card:

SquareRootsReferenceCard_1-400_5x4_WhiteBackground

Square Roots Reference Card – 5 to a page

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Square Roots Reference Card – 10 to a page

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Get the FREE .pdf here: SquareRootsReferenceCardFrom1to400

Try some related activities:

ApproximatingSquareRootsMaze1 ApproximatingSquareRootsPuzzles1 RationalAndIrrational1

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